Following the Seasons

My sadness in losing this year's hunt is not limited to filling my freezer. There is a spiritual aspect to the hunt as well.

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Halibut Stories

We grab some dried salmon strips we brought from home, a six-pack, and head on over. It is going to be a long night of halibut stories.

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It’s All in the Little Things

I have always believed that we are privileged with the responsibility of serving one another and living outside of our own lives.

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Quiet Time

If you are anything like me, it takes a hefty supply of vitamin D tablets and a whole lot of planning or as I like to call it, “quiet time.”

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Grand Mal/Gran Fe

As a pragmatist, it is difficult to explain many of the things that happened during and after our son’s journey through childhood epilepsy.

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#2 Salmon Drive

Mom was more than tough. She was mother, wife, teacher, principal, cook, creative-genius, planner, student, and pilot. She was Alaskan.

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A Soldier’s Heart

As I recall how my husband and I met, I am reminded of the fact that at that time, he was first, and foremost, a soldier.

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¿Cerveza con sal?

It was no surprise to me that my new friends wanted to meet at a café after class to “hang-out and share a beer.”

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Harmony

If I want to convey a message of harmony, I need to carefully choose words that compliment the imagery I strive to portray for the reader.

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Yuguunga

Wiinga Ayagiaruunga. Manuqutarmiunguunga. Mamterillermiungulua-llu. Kassatun ayukengerma. Tuall, Yuguunga-wii. Hello. My name is Ayagiaq. I am from Manokotak and Bethel. I am non-Native on the outside, but I am Yugtun. When I found out the May issue of the ECHO was focusing on what being Alaskan means to you, I knew immediately that I wanted to write on the topic. However, I wasn’t prepared for the internal struggle I would face as I mulled around how to describe it. Then, I realized that being Alaskan meant not having to define it because it is in everything I do, everything I say, and everything I am.

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